Last Updated

03 Apr 2019

Social interactions and malaria preventive behaviours in Sub-Saharan Africa

Objectives

When facing choices under uncertainty, individuals have incentives to learn from the actions and outcomes of their neighbours. The action of neighbours may also create peer pressure to engage in certain behaviours.

The objective of this study is to determine the importance of these social interactions in the adoption and spread of ITNs, IPT, and ACT using data from all the Demographic Health Surveys (DHS), malaria Indicator Surveys (MIS), and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) between 1999 and 2010 for 34 Sub- Saharan countries.

This project aims to estimate the importance of social interactions on bednet usage and preventive treatment during pregnancy in Sub‐Saharan Africa. Social interactions refer to the influence of neighbours’ behaviours on the individual's behaviour (endogenous social interactions) and to the effect of neighbours’ characteristics on the individual's behaviour (exogenous social interactions). 

Principal Institution(s)

Principal Investigator
Rationale and Abstract

Preventative technologies that have been shown to be effective in clinical trials include the use of insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs), intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy (IPT) and prompt and effective treatment of malaria using artemisinin combination therapy (ACT). Despite the fact that most people in Sub-Saharan Africa are aware of the existence of these technologies, a large number of individuals do not adopt them. ITNs, IPT, and ACT are relatively new and their benefits may not be widely evident to the general population because individuals need to continuously experience these technologies to ascertain their effectiveness. When facing choices under uncertainty, individuals have incentives to learn from the actions and outcomes of their neighbours. The action of neighbours may also create peer pressure to engage in certain behaviours. 

Date

2011 Sep - 2014 Jun

Total Project Funding

$147,000

Funding Details