Last Updated

03 Jul 2019

Building Out Vector-borne diseases in sub-Saharan Africa: the BOVA Network

Objectives

The goal of this Network is to make communities in sub-Saharan Africa more resilient to the threat from insect-transmitted diseases; chiefly malaria, a rural disease, and diseases carried by Aedes species mosquitoes, like Zika and dengue, which are primarily urban diseases.

To achieve this goal we need to find new solutions to stop mosquitoes entering houses and, for Aedes-borne diseases, to reduce the aquatic habitats in towns and cities. Whilst this may sound common sense, despite repeated attempts, we have been singularly unsuccessful in bringing together experts in insect-transmitted diseases and the built environment over the past 50 years. 

Specifically, the Network will:

  1. facilitate the exchange of information about insect-transmitted diseases and the built environment between disciplines,
  2. fund basic and applied research to develop and scale-up products and novel approaches to reducing the threat from insect-transmitted diseases in the built environment,
  3. help build the next generation of scientists, architects, engineers and planners developing approaches to the control of these diseases and
  4. to reach out to funders and those engaged in development projects, like United Nations organisations and the Development Banks to invest in the control of vector-borne diseases through the built environment.

This Network is designed to help protect the citizens of sub-Saharan Africa from the threat of insect-transmitted diseases and has the potential to change the lives of millions.

Principal Investigator
Rationale and Abstract

The BOVA Network will provide a number of deliverables that will contribute to a reduction in malaria and Aedes-borne diseases through improvements in the built environment including:

  1. Multi-sectoral action in vector-borne diseases. 
  2. Information exchange.
  3. Evidence-based decision making. 
  4. Development of new products and approaches.
  5. Sustainability

Date

2017 Jul - 2020 Jul

Funding Details

Research programme Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF), Project reference: BB/R00532X/1