Last Updated

08 Jan 2019

ASTMH 2016, Jacob I. Meyers: "Genetic basis of outdoor host seeking in Anopheles coluzzii from Bioko Island"

In collaboration with ASTMH, Image Audiovisuals, and session presenters, MESA brings you this webcast from the 65th ASTMH annual meeting in Atlanta, November 2016.

Title: "Genetic basis of outdoor host seeking in Anopheles coluzzii from Bioko Island"

Speaker: Jacob I. Meyers, Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University

Session information: Symposium 151: "A Shift in Biting Behavior: Outdoor Host-Seeking Behavior of Malaria Vectors and the Potential Impact on Malaria Control"

Wednesday, 16 November, 4:00 - 5:45 PM, Marriott - Marquis D

Abstract:

Increased vector control efforts during the last 15 years have drastically reduced malaria infections and deaths. Most malaria vector control programs rely on long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets (LLINs) and/or indoor residual spraying (IRS) of insecticides to protect people and reduce mosquito populations. These vector control tools are largely predicated on the endophagic and endophilic host seeking behavior of malaria vectors. However, the use of these methods has sometimes led to an increase in outdoor host seeking behavior of malaria mosquitoes. It is widely thought that such a behavioral shift may threaten the efficacy of these control methods in the future. Subsequently, it has been suggested that additional tools that specifically target outdoor biting mosquitoes are needed to continue overall reductions in malaria transmission worldwide, as well as in regions nearing malaria elimination. This symposium will address outdoor host-seeking behavior in Anopheles mosquitoes and the risk it poses to malaria control. This session will feature recent examples of increased Anopheles outdoor host seeking behavior in the field and explore its genetic basis. It will also discuss the potential effects of outdoor biting on malaria transmission and control, as well as novel vector control strategies that target outdoor host seeking mosquitoes.

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Collaborator(s)

Texas A&M University

Date Published